Hillary Clinton: Let’s Be Honest, Black Men In Hoodies Are Scary

Hillary Clinton: Let’s Be Honest, Black Men In Hoodies Are Scary

Add this one to the “imagine if she were a Republican” files: old white lady expresses fear of young black men, political funeral details to come.

During a campaign speech on Thursday, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton touched on race, saying that even “open-minded white people” are sometimes afraid of hoodie-wearing black people:

“I mean if we’re honest, for a lot of well-meaning, open-minded white people, the sight of a young black man in a hoodie still evokes a twinge of fear,” Clinton said.

Hillary’s statement raises a number of questions, first of which is: does Hillary Clinton feel a twinge of fear at the sight of a young black man in a hoodie?

Or, if you want to come at the issue from a different angle: Is she “honest?” What about “well-meaning?” Does Hillary Clinton view herself as being “open-minded?” If so, her remarks seem to very clearly suggest that she may in fact feel a twinge of fear at the sight of a young black man in a hoodie.

Then again, given the conditions she listed — honest, well-meaning, and open-minded — perhaps Hillary didn’t have herself in mind at all.

Source: Hillary Clinton: Let’s Be Honest, Black Men In Hoodies Are Scary

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11 thoughts on “Hillary Clinton: Let’s Be Honest, Black Men In Hoodies Are Scary

  1. Okay folks, let’s have the full speech for full context. You’ll realize that whoever chopped this video up is just trying to smear her. She’s PROMOTING #BlackLivesMatter here! Here’s the full speech:

    In 2013, the median wealth of Black families was around $11,000. For White families, it was more than $134,000. And nearly half of all black families have lived in poor neighborhoods for at least two generations, compared to just 7 percent of White families. Today across America, our schools are actually more segregated than they were in l968.

    Now, I believe that our problems are not all because of the virulence of some. Some of the comments you read on the internet are just so distressing. Some of the organizations that have promoted racism are deplorable. But I do think that all of us have to search our hearts hard to think about what more we can and should do. I mean, if we’re honest, for a lot of well-meaning, open-minded White people the sight of a young Black man in a hoodie still evokes a twinge of fear. And news reports about poverty and crime and discrimination evoke sympathy, even empathy, but they do rarely spur us to action or prompt us to question our own assumptions and privilege.

    We cannot hide from these hard truths about race and justice in America. We have to name them and own them and change them. And we can start by standing up and saying loudly and clearly, yes, Black lives matter. And then we need – (applause) – and then we need to take action, and that action has to be at the local level, the state level and the federal level.

    Now, over the past months I’ve proposed a series of reforms aimed at the challenge of systemic racism. Ending the era of mass incarceration and taking new approaches to criminal justice. Investing in early childhood education and preschool so that children of color and all children who grow up in poverty don’t start out at a disadvantage from the very beginning. We should be creating pipelines to opportunity, not to prison. (Applause.)
    Source: http://newsone.com/3158640/hillary-clinton-white-fear-black-hoodies-speech/

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  2. You know, as a “well meaning, open minded” white male there is a part of me that understands what she means (I think) however the well meaning, open minded and self aware white me also knows this “fear” is irrational and a response to old “dna” if you like and it has actually nothing to do with black people but with “different races” and even different nations/countries and even regions in general. The “I have to defend my personal space” syndrome we people still posses. To use this (probably to gain some doubting right wingers) is sooooo wrong and out of place and to portray this on a single group in society is just plain racist.

    do I have a certain “fear” if I see a black man in a hoodie? yes, so do I if I see a skinhead in a bomber jacket. I ignore it, look past it and form my opinion (if the situation asks for it) after I actually have gotten to know the other. Many skinheads are very nice people and I imagine the majority of hoodie wearing black teens as well

    We Dutch still get the crap scared out of us if we see a German on a bike…… heheheheheh (just kidding neighbors)

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