America’s ‘white alone’ population decreasing while all other ethnic groups grow – census data

The ‘white alone’ population in the US experienced a decrease between 2015 and 2016 while all other races saw an increase, according to newly-released census data. The numbers also showed that the overall population of the US is getting older.

The figures, released by the US Census Bureau on Thursday, found that while all other groups experienced a natural increase (having more births than deaths) during the time period, the ‘non-Hispanic white alone’ group saw a natural decrease of 163,300.

The decrease left the ‘white alone’ population remaining at 198 million of the nation’s 325 million people.

Meanwhile, the country’s Asian population saw the biggest surge, growing by 3 percent to 21.4 million. Those who identified as being of two or more races also grew by 3 percent, to 8.5 million.

The Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population grew by 2.1 percent to 1.5 million, while Hispanics grew by 2 percent, to 57.5 million.

Ageing population 

The census data also found that the US population has a “distinctly older age profile” than it did 16 years ago. The median age rose from 35.3 years in April 2000 to 37.9 years in July 2016.

“The baby-boom generation is largely responsible for this trend,”said Peter Borsella, a demographer in the Census Bureau’s population division.

“Baby boomers began turning 65 in 2011 and will continue to do so for many years to come,” he added, referring to the age a person can start using Medicare, which is government healthcare for seniors and those with disabilities.

Residents aged 65 and over grew from 35 million in 2000 to 49.2 million in 2016, growing to 15.2 percent of the overall population.

That figure comes amid ongoing concerns of the impact that the baby-boom generation will have on social services including Medicare. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, net Medicare spending is expected to nearly double over the next decade, from $592 billion to $1.2 trillion.

When the Census Bureau analyzed the data by state, it found that all 50 states experienced either an increase in median age or had the same median age as a year earlier.

The highest median age (44.6 years) is represented in Maine, while the lowest (30.8 years) is seen in Utah.

Source: America’s ‘white alone’ population decreasing while all other ethnic groups grow – census data 

TOP 7 BLACK-OWNED DOLL MAKERS AND DESIGNERS

Doll making has been around since the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Greece and Rome. The first usage of dolls as toys has been documented in Greece around 100 AD. The most well-known doll makers and designers in the U.S. include Mattel, Hasbro, and others. But there also many African and African American entrepreneurs that are in the business!
Here are 7 of the top Black-owned doll makers and designers:

#1 – Trinity Designs: This Texas-based doll maker began making African American dolls in 2001. Their product line includes dolls that capture the image and character of the African American sorority sister, as well as adult, collectible dolls, which can be purchased online.

#2 – Uzuri Kid Kiz: This doll maker is based in Columbus, Ohio, and has been making dolls that reflect the African American culture since 1997. The word “uzuri” means beauty and expresses the company’s belief that all kids are beautiful, no matter what color or race they are.

#3 – Queens of Africa Dolls: This Nigerian-based company makes dolls (pictured above) and doll accessories that promote the African heritage. Their dolls have both natural and braided hair and are dressed in clothing made from African colors and prints. The dolls are available worldwide, but are especially popular in Nigeria, where they are said to be easily outselling Barbie® dolls.

#4 – Tonner-One World DollsThis company’s slogan is “We are pretty girls, and we rule the world.” Founders Trent T. Daniel and Stacey McBride-Irby (who  former designed Barbie® dolls for Mattel) created a multi-cultural line of girl dolls in 2010 to fill a gap in diverse representation in the doll industry. They are based in Houston, Texas.

#5 – Double Dutch DollsDouble Dutch Dolls designs and produces a line of multi-cultural dolls, books, and accessories for girls ages 8 and up. The dolls are African-American, Hispanic, Biracial and Multiracial. The company was founded in 2013 and is based in Marietta, Georgia.

#6 – Positively Perfect Dolls: The company was founded in 2010 by a mom and former professor as a way to encourage young girls. The dolls, which are available in local Target and Walmart stores, are designed to “encourage dreams, promote intelligence, challenge perceptions, and open hearts to all types of beauty.”

#7 – EthiDolls: This company makes authentic, collectible African-American signature dolls and accessories that embrace African heritage, culture, and history. The company was founded in 2003 by two women Ethiopian entrepreneurs from the New York City area. Their goal was to develop a line of culturally authentic and unique Signature Dolls and Accessories that teach history and celebrate cultural diversity.

Black doll enthusiasts are also encouraged to visit The National Black Doll Museum in Mansfield, Massachusetts. The museum was founded in 2012 and is the first museum in New England and the second museum in the nation dedicated to preserving the history of black dolls. For more information, visit www.nbdmhc.org

 

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Chicago Man Founds Project to Help Fathers Be the Best Dad They Can Be 


[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPqVgUuhA2Y]

Seven years ago, Sheldon Smith learned he would be a father at the age of 20. After experiencing a childhood with a father who was in and out of his life, Smith decided it was time to break the cycle that continues in his community.

According to U.S. Census Data, nearly half of African-American children grow up without a father in the household. Smith wanted to give young fathers a way to prepare for the road ahead.

Thus, the Chicago native founded the Dovetail Project, a program that works to prepare young dads to be the best they can be, while also improving their parenting skills.

The organization works to increase the amount of quality time fathers spend with their children, provide skills needed to secure employment opportunities and ensure that these men are either enrolled in school or working toward a GED.

“The thing I love most about the Dovetail Project is that it’s not a mandatory program,” Smith told CNN. “These young men are really volunteering to get the help and support they need.”

The 12-week program was developed through research by Smith and even includes a lesson on Felony Street Law to help the men avoid incarceration. Since 2010, close to 300 men have completed the program.

Recent graduate Corey Lennore called The Dovetail Project a godsend. Not only does the organization provide life skills for the men, but it also gives them a sense of encouragement and reassurance.

“We motivate each other. We do job searches together. It’s a great thing,” Lennore said.

On June 15, The Dovetail Project graduated it’s 15th Fatherhood Training Class. To apply to become a student, go to the website at thedovetailproject.org.

Source: Chicago Man Founds Project to Help Fathers Be the Best Dad They Can Be 

Why You Can’t Ever Call an Enslaved Woman a “Mistress”

In the black community, many different opinions abound regarding the usefulness of Black History Month. For some, it is viewed as a necessary and critical tool for cultural celebration and propagating the importance of our collective historical achievements, which otherwise would go unnoticed. For others, it feels like a reductive display offorced lip service conducted during the shortest and coldest month of the year, in lieu of providing us with a more sustained and inclusive role in the everyday curriculum. But what we all can agree on is that presenting our history in a wholly accurate and factual manner delivered with the correct context is of the utmost importance, which is why we react so strongly to inaccurate and/or misrepresentative claims.

That irritation was inflamed this past weekend when The Washington Postpublished an article about a restoration that would be occurring at Monticello, the plantation of America’s third president, Thomas Jefferson, which is operated as a museum. The restoration to be completed will involve unmasking a bathroom installed in 1941 just steps from Jefferson’s bedroom to reveal what the room really was: Sally Hemings’s bedroom.

In the black community, many different opinions abound regarding the usefulness of Black History Month. For some, it is viewed as a necessary and critical tool for cultural celebration and propagating the importance of our collective historical achievements, which otherwise would go unnoticed. For others, it feels like a reductive display offorced lip service conducted during the shortest and coldest month of the year, in lieu of providing us with a more sustained and inclusive role in the everyday curriculum. But what we all can agree on is that presenting our history in a wholly accurate and factual manner delivered with the correct context is of the utmost importance, which is why we react so strongly to inaccurate and/or misrepresentative claims.

That irritation was inflamed this past weekend when The Washington Postpublished an article about a restoration that would be occurring at Monticello, the plantation of America’s third president, Thomas Jefferson, which is operated as a museum. The restoration to be completed will involve unmasking a bathroom installed in 1941 just steps from Jefferson’s bedroom to reveal what the room really was: Sally Hemings’s bedroom.

Jefferson owned many slaves at Monticello, but Hemings has received the most attention because she is believed to have mothered at least six of his children. This fact led The Washington Post to use the word “mistress” in the title of its article (which has now been changed) and its tweet regarding the article.


This enraged many people because it’s insulting to identify the relationship between a slave and a slave-owner using the term “mistress” when that term denotes a relationship predicated on mutual choice, autonomy, and affirmative consent — things slaves do not have. As a slave, Hemings was not afforded the privilege of self-determination, meaning she didn’t do what she wanted; she did what she was told. The word to describe that type of interaction is not ‘affair’; it’s rape.

This is so problematic, not just because it erases the abuse that Hemings endured along with generations of other male and female slaves, but also because it romanticizes Jefferson as a man vitalized by romance, reframing his predatory behavior under the guise of mutual enchantment, as Mikki Kendall artfully establishes in her informative Twitter thread.

But this is not an isolated incident, nor is it a brand-new error. The misnomer of “mistress” has been applied to enslaved women by different publications at different times recently and throughout history. In 2015, The New York Times posted a lengthy and in-depthobituary on the life of civil rights icon, Julian Bond, which featured the line, “Julian Bond’s great-grandmother Jane Bond was the slave mistress of a Kentucky farmer.” The Timespublic editor ultimately issued an apology for the mistake after swift backlash erupted online.

And just to reinforce how insidious this misused term has become, it should also be noted that Bond, a black man with a deep mind on issues of race, even reportedly used the word “mistress” himself to describe his great-grandmother, according to The Atlanta-Journal Constitution. That’s why it so important to be vigilant about contextualizing our history, and any history, in an absolutely correct manner.

A slave cannot be a mistress. This is not an “alternative fact” but rather the objective reality of being dominated, dehumanized, and disenfranchised against your will. As we collectively aim to have black history given the weight and appreciation it’s due, let us resolve to ensure that this historical discrepancies are straightened out, corrected, and handed down to future generations with a proper frame of reference. Let’s do better.

Source: Why You Can’t Ever Call an Enslaved Woman a “Mistress” 

Rapper Prodigy of Legendary Queens Duo Mobb Deep Dead at 42

Prodigy counted Hot 97 Summer Jam among his last concerts before his death. (Dave Kotinsky /Getty Images)

Prodigy, one-half of the iconic rap duo Mobb Deep from Queens, N.Y., has died.

“It is with extreme sadness and disbelief that we confirm the death of our dear friend Albert Johnson, better known to millions of fans as Prodigy of legendary N.Y. rap duo Mobb Deep,” Mobb Deep’s publicist said in a statement to Rolling Stone Tuesday, June 20. “Prodigy was hospitalized a few days ago in Vegas after a Mobb Deep performance for complications caused by a sickle cell anemia crisis. As most of his fans know, Prodigy battled the disease since birth. The exact causes of death have yet to be determined. We would like to thank everyone for respecting the family’s privacy at this time.”

Prodigy, who was 42 when he died, formed Mobb Deep with rapper Havoc and the group enjoyed success in the 1990s with hits including “Shook Ones” and the Lil Kim feature, “Quiet Storm.” They also enjoyed success with “Hey Luv (Anything)” in 2001, which marked a turn away from raw rap toward a more commercial sound.

Prodigy’s last performance was in Las Vegas at the Art of Rap Fest Saturday, June 15.

Source: Rapper Prodigy of Legendary Queens Duo Mobb Deep Dead at 42 

Alton Glass Debuts New Virtual Reality Film At American Black Film Festival

 Back in 2014, Alton Glass’ groundbreaking drama CRU made history at the American Black Film Festival (ABFF) Independent Film Awards when it took home a win in each category it was nominated for, including Best Film and Best Director. Three years later, the award-winning filmmaker returned to the annual festival to break new ground yet again with his virtual reality movie, A Little Love, which premiered Saturday, June 17, 2017.

The story of A Little Love explores the themes of love, family, and adventure, and stars actors Kellita Smith and Dorien Wilson. Watch Glass summarize the plot of the film in the video clip below:

https://twitter.com/_/status/876167574136004608

Although the majority of the films screened at ABFF were shot via a standard camera, Glass’ VR film uses a combination of live-action and animation footage to leverage innovative VR technology in a way that completely immerses viewers in a 360° experience. In turn, this enables the audience to feel part of the narrative itself.

“Seeing the audience watch A Little Love for the first time was really awesome,” Glass says, in an interview with BLACK ENTERPRISE.“They were looking all around, laughing, and just fully transported into this experience. I think that this was something very different for them to experience at a film festival [and] at ABFF, and I think that they loved it.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVfkW9blYmT/embed/?cr=1&v=7&wp=656#%7B%22ci%22%3A0%2C%22os%22%3A5639.06%7D

Along with providing the audience with an exclusive VR experience, the accompanying panel included a Q&A about the convergence of technology, media, and entertainment, which featured Glass as well as VR experts and television executives. During the talkback session, Glass opened up about being one of the few African American pioneers in the VR filmmaking landscape.  He also spoke about his decision to explore VR filmmaking, after directing a number of highly acclaimed movies like The Confidant (2010), starring Boris Kodjoe and David Banner; and The Mannsfield 12(2007), which was acquired by BET.

“What inspired me to create a narrative in virtual reality like this, was being able to see someone like myself—for people of color or diversity—inside of an experience in virtual reality,” Glass says. “I’ve never seen anything where I felt like I was there—[in the film]— with people that looked like me. So, I felt compelled to make that piece.”

The celebrated director also explained why he chose to premiere his VR movie during the five-day festival. “It was important for me to debut this film at ABFF because one, ABFF has very supportive throughout my career,” Glass says, also adding that secondly, A Little Love is one of the first VR films to feature people of color.

Source: Alton Glass Debuts New Virtual Reality Film at American Black Film Festival 

Mother of Tupac Shakur Dead at 69

Afeni Shakur-Davis, mother of slain rapper Tupac Shakur, died Monday night at age 69.

Davis was born in California and was a member of the “Panther 21” in the 1970’s.

Davis’ death was confirmed by the Marin County Sheriff, but a cause of death has not yet been confirmed. TheAtlanta Journal Constitution claimsthat deputies responded to a report of cardiac arrest on Monday night. Davis was taken to the hospital where she later died.

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Twitter Reacts to Historic $17,500,000 Sale of ‘the Nat Turner Movie’ After Its Sundance Premiere

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The cast of 2016’s The Birth of a Nation—a movie written and directed by, and starring, Nate Parker (center)—which tells the story of slave-rebellion leader Nat TurnerIMDb

For a while, all we had was this breathtaking photo from Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation film. It’s the biopic about Nat Turner, the early-19th-century slave who rounded up other slaves and led a rebellion against white slave owners, killing some 60 white people in Virginia in 1831. Parker wrote, directed and is starring in the independent film.

On Monday night the film premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival in Utah, and those in attendance left the theater singing the film’s praises on social media. The Root, which was in attendance, lauded the film as well, and spoke with Parker.

After news broke about Fox Searchlight securing worldwide rights to the film for $17.5 million—which, as Deadlie explains, is the biggest sale a Sundance premiere has ever seen—fans of Parker and the movie rejoiced on Twitter.

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America’s Cultural Roots Traced to Enslaved African Ancestors

This is the fourth in a series of excerpts from Jubilee: the Emergence of African-American Culture by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

O black and unknown bards of long ago,
How came your lips to touch the sacred fire?
How, in your darkness, did you come to know
The power and beauty of the minstrels’ lyre?
Who first from midst his bonds lifted his eyes?
Who first from out the still watch, lone and long,
Feeling the ancient faith of prophets rise
Within his dark-kept soul, burst into song?
James Weldon Johnson,
“O Black and Unknown Bards”

Most traditional West African societies, the sources of the vast majority of enslaved Africans in the Americas, had dynamic, vibrant, expressive cultures. The languages spoken were unusually animated, by most European standards. Peppered with proverbs, they were sources of moral and ethical training as well as simple vehicles of communication.

Everyday conversation, as well as storytelling and oratory during sacred rituals and other performance events, was filled with energy and dynamism.

Indigenous musics, which were extremely complex, permeated all aspects of traditional African social life. They were used to establish and maintain the rhythms of work. No festival or life-cycle celebration was complete without the presence of music, the moving rhythmic center of traditional African social and cultural life.

Dancing to these rhythms was equally pervasive. Such dancing challenged the rhythmic sensibilities of talented performers. Led by acrobatic leaders, who were frequently priests dressed in masks and elaborate costumes, communities of dancers frequently involved all members of society regardless of age, sex, or social status.

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Ohio Students Claim Classmates Dress Up as KKK, Utter Racial Slurs

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A photo of what is said to be a Pickerington (Ohio) High School North student dressed up as a Klansman  

Roni Cook detailed several racial issues that she and her sister have had to navigate at Pickerington High School North for the past two years. 

An Ohio mom moved her two daughters to a new school district to get them a better education, but instead the girls have had to endure two years of racist abuse, ABC 6 On Your Side reports

According to student Roni Cook, she and her sister have been dealing with the racist incidents at Ohio’s Pickerington High School North, where her classmates thinks their antics are “funny.” 

“Some of the students think it’s OK and think it’s funny to say the n-word, say jokes about it,” Roni told the news station.

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